What is a Gorger girl

Cases: The dative

The dative case is used to describe the indirect object of a sentence. The indirect object is the recipient of the direct object. In addition to changes in the article, plural nouns also receive an -n suffix (except for nouns that already end in an -n).

The little girl gives the old man his piece of bread. The little girl gives the old man her * piece of bread.
It gives the small children his hat, his skirt and his shirt.She gives the little children her hat, her skirt and her shirt.
God gives the girl thousands of thalers for her generosity.God gives the little girl thousands of coins for her generosity.

* Nota Bene: although in English 'little girl' is referred to as 'she,' in German the word 'Mädchen' is grammatically neutral, so the possessive pronoun has to be 'sein' (its). Right now, there are more and more people who would refer to Mädchen as 'sie' (she, her), especially among young people, since they find it insulting to talk about females as 'it.'

Nevertheless, in formal writing, if the pronoun appears in the same sentence as the word 'Mädchen,' it should be neuter ('es' 'sein', usu.). However, please note that the native speaker narrator used 'their generosity' in the last sentence instead of 'his' ...

Definite and Indefinite articles in the dative case

Articles in the accusative case (there is no equivalent of the indefinite article in the plural, since, just like in English, you can't say 'a lentils'):

thea / annone
masculinethe mana manno man(man)
femininethe womanof a womannot a woman(woman)
neuterthe childa childno child(child)
Pluralthe clothesClothesno clothes(clothes)

Please note that plural nouns also get an -n suffix, unless they already end in an -n:

Need -n
the children=>the children(children)
the men=>the men(men)
the valleys=>the thalers(old coins)
the stars=>the stars(stars)
 
Don't need -n
the parents=>to the parents(parents)
the girls=>the girls(little girls)
the women=>the women(women)
the princes=>the prince(princes)

Dative prepositions

In addition to indicating the indirect object of some sentences, the dative case is also used with several prepositions. (There are also prepositions that can take either the dative or the accusative.):

from, except, at, with, after, since, from, to, opposite
The little girl was forsaken by the whole world!The little girl was abandoned by the whole world!
She goes out into the world and after a while she meets an old man.She goes off into the wide world, and after a while meets an old man.
He's hungry so she takes a piece of bread out of her pocket and gives it to the old man.He is hungry, so she takes a piece of bread out of her pocket and gives it to the old man.
Then comes a child who almost freezes to death. The little girl covers the child with his dress.Afterwards there comes a child who almost freezes to death. The little girl covers the child with her dress.
Two more children come by later, and she is just as generous with these children.Later two more children pass her, and she is just as generous with these children (vis-a-vis).
Fortunately, apart from the three children and the old man, nobody else comes by. The girl was out of clothes!Luckily, nobody else passed her by except for the three children and the old man. The little girl had no more clothes!
But God rewards them. He holds the girl by the figurative hand and gives her the stars from the sky.But God rewards her. He takes her by the figurative hand and presents her the stars from the sky.
The girl has been incredibly rich since that night.Since this night the little girl is insanely rich.
Unfortunately, wealth has gone to her head. She is not always nice to the other castle residents!Unfortunately, her wealth went to her head. She is not always very nice to the other residents of the castle!

Nota Bene: Did you know that you can memorize the dative prepositions to the music of Johann Strauss's Blue Danube Waltz (On the beautiful blue Danube)?

Dative verbs

Finally, the dative case is used with a handful of verbs - for example thank you, fall in, follow, and help:

The old man thanks the little girl for the bread. The old man thanks the little girl for the bread.
She helps three other children by giving the children their clothes.She helps three other children, when she gives her clothes to the children.
Then something wonderful happens to the little girl! Stars fall from the sky, become gold coins, and she becomes rich.Then something wonderful happens to the little girl! Stars fall from the sky, turn into gold coins, and she becomes rich.

Here are some of the most common verbs that take the dative case:

replyanswerGod answers the girl.God answers the little girl.
to thankthank youThe girl thanks Almighty God for his help.The little girl thanks the almighty Lord for his help.
come to mindoccur to someone The girl meets an old man and it falls to him to give the man his piece of bread. An old man comes towards the little girl, and it occurs to her to give the man her piece of bread.
consequencesfollowThe old man follows the girl with his eyes and is very grateful. The old man follows the little girl with his eyes, and he is very thankful.
givegive (needs a direct object too)The girl gives her dress to a little child. The little girl gives her dress to a small child.
belongbelongNow the girl's only one shirt and two old shoes. Now only a blouse and two old shoes belong to the little girl.
believebelieve The next child says that it has nothing either; the girl believes him and gives him his shirt. The next child also has nothing; the little girl believes him and gives him her shirt.
to congratulatecongratulateGod does not yet congratulate the girl; he puts it to the test again. God doesn't congratulate the little girl yet; he puts her to the test one more time.
helphelpThe girl helps a third child; it gives the child his shoes. Now there is nothing left.The little girl helps yet another child; she gives the child her shoes. Now she has nothing.
impressimpress someone The girl's selflessness impresses Almighty God.The girl's selflessness appeals to the almighty God.
fitfit, suitIt gets new clothes made of gold and silk; his new clothes suit him very well!She gets new clothes made of gold and silk; her new things fit her really well!
happenhappenWhat happened to the girl?What happened to the little girl?
damagehurt Can anything harm the girl?Can anything harm the little girl?
givegive (a present) God also gives the girl stars that turn into golden thalers.God gives the little girl a gift of stars that turn into golden coins.
sendsend, mailShe sent the German government a letter and a lot of money and immediately bought herself a name: Gerdi.She sends the German government a letter and a pile of money and immediately buys herself a name: Gerdi.
trusttrustFrom that day on, she no longer trusts anyone.From this day on, she doesn't trust anybody.
hurthurtIt really hurts to be around other people.It really hurts her to have to be together with other people.
contradictcontradictYour actions today contradict your earlier selflessness.Her acts today contradict her previous selflessness.
to listenlisten to (e.g., advice)She no longer even listens to her own inner voice. This is definitely a tragic turning point!She doesn't even listen to her own inner voice anymore. A tragic turn of events, for sure!

Word order

When a sentence or clause contains both a dative and an accusative noun, the dative noun precedes the accusative noun:

The girl gives the old man her piece of bread.The little girl gives her piece of bread to the old man.
It gives the children his clothes.She gives her clothes to the children.