Doll maker of the 1920s who skinned the daughter's name

日常 德语 听力 Everyday German: 受 保护 的 手工业

【小编 碎 碎】手工 制作 帽子? 修理 贵重 的 娃娃? 在 批量生产 和 百货公司 成为 主流 的 今天 , 这些 手工 制作 在 德国 依旧 依旧 存在 , 使得 顾客 个人 的 特殊 要求 能 得以 满足。
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Making hats by hand? Repair valuable dolls? This still exists in Germany in times of mass production and department stores. In this way, individual customer requests can be met and what is loved can be preserved.
Speaker:

Whoever gets their hair cut goes to the hairdresser. If you want to have the walls painted, go to the nearest master painter. However, those who need new headgear these days never even think of going to a hat shop. And dolls that break are usually thrown in the trash. But they still exist, those who make hats by hand or repair the dolls. Some call themselves a milliner, others were given the name "puppet doctor". A milliner used to be the job title for someone who only made women's hats, while a hatter only made men's hats. Since 2004, the profession of milliner has been the official name for all those who make hats in Germany. Hannelore Mertesacker works as a milliner in Bad Honnef, and Annemarie Beusing as a "puppet doctor" in Bonn. Both have one thing in common: their manual skills. For more than 40 years Hannelore Mertesacker has been making all kinds of headgear, including for opera performances.
Hannelore Mertesacker:
"Mastersingers. I made a lot of hats and berets and basques, those old hats and headgear in the Meistersinger time. Very nice things. What I do a lot are headgear for weddings - a bit based on the English wedding or the Monegasque wedding. Those were very elaborate headgear and beautiful things that you saw there, and it’s a bit in that direction. Did us good. "
Speaker:
Hannelore Mertesacker made headgear such as berets or berets for the actors in Richard Wagner's opera “Die Meistersinger”. A beret is a flat, round or square headgear that was initially only worn by educated people, but is now also seen on the heads of soldiers and police officers, for example. Berets are flat caps that are a trademark of the Basque ethnic group in the Franco-Spanish border region. The milliner finds that her business is particularly good in times of nobility weddings such as Prince William and Kate Middelton or Prince Albert of Monaco and Charlene Wittstock. Royal weddings are good for business. Your customers then want similar headgear for their own weddings, hats that are based on these models. Hannelore Mertesacker practices an old craft. Hatters and milliners, such as bakers, carpenters and blacksmiths, belonged to an old guild that existed as early as the 14th century. Guilds controlled, among other things, the quality and prices of products and regulated training. Nowadays, craftsmen who cater to individual customer requests are rarely to be found.
Hannelore Mertesacker:
"I think there are in Germany as a whole, I don't want to commit myself to the number, around 250 craft businesses that are then also entered in the craft register."
Speaker:
Hannelore Mertesacker doesn't know exactly how many craft businesses there are still in Germany, she doesn't want to commit to one number. Those who become self-employed as craftsmen have to register themselves in the craft register. This is a directory at a Chamber of Crafts in a city. Anyone who runs their company in several cities must be entered in the respective trade register in each city. The term “role” goes back to the fact that before computers were introduced, company names were listed alphabetically on index cards. And these index cards were sorted in long boxes. If you were looking for a company, these boxes had to be "rolled" electrically until the correct letter appeared. In Hannelore Mertesacker's small shop, caps, hats with wide brims or with decorative flowers are piled up. Taking measurements, choosing fabrics, sewing, creating - in the small Mertesacker studio there is not only the sewing machine, there are ribbons, scissors and half-finished hats. A very important item is the linden wood head on which the hats are made. The wood of the linden tree has the advantage that it is soft. Hannelore Mertesacker explains how a hat is "put on":
Hannelore Mertesacker:
"I have a wooden shape here, a wooden edge, it has a groove in here, so you can pin pins and the materials - that is, felt or straw - with a tape. In the top of the plate [are] different holes and I can put different wooden heads on them. So now I can make a men's hat shape out of it, because I have the men's hat head. "
Speaker:
The milliner puts the wooden head shape on a plate, the shape that the respective hat should have. This plate has a depression, a groove, at the lower end, on the edge of the wood. The groove is used, among other things, to mark the edge of the hat, the hem, with pins. The respective material of the hat is pulled over the wooden head shape. A particularly popular material is felt. It is made of hare or rabbit hair or wool. But of course there are also fabric, leather, fur or straw hats. A hat is also part of the equipment of some dolls. There is, however, no real apprenticeship for the craft of the “doll maker”. Dolls were produced in Germany from the 15th century. Especially old dolls such as porcelain dolls are very valuable. It pays to take her to a “doll doctor” if, for example, an arm is torn off or an eye is missing. Annemarie Beusing works as a “puppet doctor” in Bonn. How did you come up with the idea of ​​choosing this profession?
Annemarie Beusing:
“The old dolls were very expensive. What you had was usually in need of repair, and then these dollmakers also dealt with these old dolls, with the repair. And then I took a course with a dollmaker and then made a lot, a lot, out of books and 'learning by doing'. And I must have spent half a wall only making literature about dolls and dolls and repairing dolls. And of course it depends on the tool. It's not a cheap thing. You have to be properly equipped to do that. "
Speaker:
Annemarie Beusing had a doll maker show her how to repair old dolls. She has also trained herself by reading a lot of books, among other things. These take up - as they put it colloquially - half a wall unit. She also learned a lot through the direct application of her knowledge, through learning by doing. Since dollmakers need a lot of things and they have to be properly equipped, it is an expensive craft - or as Annemarie Beusing says - not a cheap thing. However, repairs are not cheap either. There can be costs of up to 350 euros. But it is worth it for most “doll mothers”. Because they have had their dolls for decades.
Annemarie Beusing:
“Those are the 'old aunts', I'll say now, the old aunts like me, war and post-war times, who then had a doll in their childhood that were small from the 30s, no, some even even with porcelain dolls in the 20s, which I then repair. Or it is then the daughter of it or the grandchild who had the beautiful doll in memory of grandma and would like it to be fully repaired. "
Speaker:
Annemarie Beusing's customers are mostly older women, old aunts as she jokingly calls them, who have owned the dolls since the 1920s and 1930s. Or their children or grandchildren who want to keep the memory of their grandmother and want the old dolls to be completely repaired. The "doll doctor" Annemarie Beusing and the milliner Hannelore Mertesacker have something in common besides their manual work: They make other people happy with their craft.

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